Books / Periodicals

HOW IT FEELS TO BE ADOPTED

by Jill Krementz

Nineteen youngsters describe how it feels to be adopted.  These young people present both the good and the bad sides about being adopted from an adolescent point of view.

TALKING WITH YOUNG CHILDREN ABOUT ADOPTION

by Mary Watkins, Ph.D. and Susan Fisher, M.D.

Current wisdom holds that adoptive parents should talk with their children about adoption as early as possible.  But it’s often hard to know what to say and when to say it.  How do children respond to the concept of adoption?  How do they incorporate adoption into their make-believe play?  What worries do they have?  This book, for parents of children ages 2 to 10, answers these questions, and many more.

THE OPEN ADOPTION EXPERIENCE

by Lois Ruskai Melina and Sharon Kaplan Roszia

Two leading adoption experts provide an authoritative and reassuring guide to the issues and concerns of adoptive and birth families through all stages of the open adoption relationship.  This book covers the steps from initial preparation, to placement and the first year, through the challenges of adolescence.

ADOPTION AFTER INFERTILITY

by Patricia Irwin Johnston, M.S.

Examines the lifelong impact of building a family by adoption after experiencing infertility.  Couples struggling to decide whether to adopt, those who have said yes to adoption, and parents of young children who have been adopted are the intended audience for this compassionate book.  It will help you and your family make the decisions that are right for you.

BEING ADOPTED:  THE LIFELONG SEARCH FOR SELF

by D. Brodzinshy, Ph.D., M. Schecter, M.D., and R. M. Henig

Illustrates common developmental pathways of adoptees as they occur throughout the life span.  It probes the complex issues that are involved in this ongoing life process.  Five themes run throughout this book:  the experience of adoptees; developmental perspectives; normality; search for self; and sense of loss.

DEAR BIRTHMOTHER,  Thank You for Our Baby

By Kathleen Silber, M.S.W. and Phylis Speedlin, Esq.

This classic book on open adoption has been updated to reflect current practices in open adoption.  It provides specific and practical suggestions about beginning and maintaining an open adoption.  It also contains actual letters written between adoptive families and birthparents. DEAR BIRTHMOTHER will cause you to carefully consider the issues involved in adoption.

TWENTY THINGS ADOPTED KIDS WISH THEIR ADOPTIVE PARENTS KNEW

by Sherrie Eldridge

The voices of adopted children are poignant, questioning, and they tell a familiar story of loss, fear, and hope.  This extraordinary book, written by a woman who was adopted herself, gives voice to children’s unspoken concerns, and shows adoptive parents how to free their kids from feelings of fear, abandonment, and shame.  Filled with powerful insights from children, parents, and experts in the field, plus practical strategies and case histories that will ring true for every adoptive family.

CHILDREN OF OPEN ADOPTION

by Kathleen Silber, M.S.W. and Patricia Martinez Dorner, M.A., L.P.C.

What are the effects of open adoption on the children involved?  Two pioneers in the field examine scores of open adoption relationships where the children involved range in age from infancy to adolescence.  The topics in this book include adoption understanding, developing relationships, families with open and closed adoptions, bonding, communication, sibling issues, and more.

PARENTING YOUR ADOPTED CHILD

by Stephanie E. Siegel

From infancy through the teenage years and beyond, this book is a practical manual for raising adopted children.  For each stage of development, it provides advise on how to handle the issues of adoption, special situations, and common questions.  Includes chapters on special needs families, adult adoptees’ issues, and a chapter for grandparents of adopted children.

RAISING ADOPTED CHILDREN

by Lois Ruskai Melina

This book is a parents’ guide to rearing children in an adotive family.  It covers circumstances important to all adoptive parents.  Drawing from child development, psychology, sociology, medicine, and also the experiences of adoptive parents, it examines the child’s physical, emotional and psychological development at every age.

 Children’s Books

 TELL ME AGAIN ABOUT THE NIGHT I WAS BORN

by Jamie Lee Curtis

Some family stories are so special that they need to be told and heard over and over again.  In asking her parents to tell me again about the night I was born, a young girl shows that this is a cherished tale that she knows by heart.  She loves to hear about every happening—the wonderful phone call announcing her birth, her parents’ plane flight and hospital visit, her first bottle and diaper change, and her first night at her new home.

LUCY’S FEET

by Stephanie Stein

Lucy is confused.  Why did her baby brother come from inside her mother but she didn’t? Does her family love her brother more than they love her?  They certainly seem to pay more attention to him.  When relatives come, they’re always saying how much her brother looks like his parents.  But who does Lucy look like?  Whose feet do HER feet look like?  This book shows both her anger and her pain, plus her resolution of difficult issues.  It is the perfect book to share with children so that they realize that it is all right to have mixed feelings about adoption and their relationship to their siblings.

A MOTHER FOR CHOCO

by Keiko Kasza

Choco is looking for his mother.  He’s sure that she must look just like him—yellow feathers, big round cheeks, wings and striped feet.  But all the animals he meets look different than he does.  Mrs. Bear doesn’t look like Choco, but she does hug, kiss, sing and dance with him.  Most importantly, though, she loves him dearly.  Together they realize that she is the perfect mother for Choco.

A BLESSING FROM ABOVE

by Patti Henderson

This is a wonderful read-aloud story about a mother kangaroo’s love for the baby bird she adopts.

SUSAN AND GORDON ADOPT A BABY

Based on the Sesame Street television scripts by Judy Freudberg and Tony Geiss

This story introduces preschool children to adoption at a level that they can understand.  This story provides a wonderful opportunity to show that adoption is one way that children enter families.

HOW I WAS ADOPTED

by Joanna Cole

Sam has a joyful story to tell, a story completely her own, yet common to millions of families.  It is a story of how babies are born and how children grow;  a story of what makes people different and what makes them the same.  But most of all it is a book about love.  In the end, Sam’s story comes full circle, inviting young readers to learn and to tell the stories of how they were adopted.  This is uniquely reassuring book about adoption that captures all the joy of loving families.

THE DAY WE MET YOU

by Phoebe Koehler

This beautifully illustrated book, using just a few simple words, describes the events on the day that parents meet their adoptive child for the first time.  Younger children will have no trouble understanding the easy text in this book.  The words emphasize the love behind each simple action.  This book is for the very youngest child, and is meant to be read out loud while you cuddle your child.

ADOPTION IS FOR ALWAYS

by Linda Walvoord Girard

When Celia learns that she is adopted, she is upset.  Why did her birthmother give her up?  Did she do something wrong?  Her parents’ explanation of adoption helps to reassure her.  They tell her that on the day that her adoption was finalized, they had a big party for all their friends and relatives.  They suggest that her adoption day become a permanent family holiday, just like her birthday is.  This is a comforting book for children to understand about birthparents.

  Newsletters/Periodicals

ADOPTIVE FAMILIES MAGAZINE

ADOPTED CHILD NEWSLETTER 

by Lois Melina

This former independent newsletter has been folded into Adoptive Families Magazine, and is included as an article in every issue.